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Agency Feature Part 1: The Uncarved Block – Melbourne Central Food Court

I have lost count of the amount of times I have used the above image as inspiration over the last 6 months for retail projects focusing on graphic language and tone of voice. I recently stumbled upon this article on Architecture.AU and found that the agency responsible for the project is The Uncarved Block. A relatively young agency, founded in 2010 by Philip Chia. The Uncarved Block’s holding page gives little away, other than a strong, contemporary impression that leaves the visitor intrigued to see more! Read More…

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Shed 5 Restaurant, Melbourne

I love the scale of this restaurant in Melbourne, Shed 5 has been designed by Loop Creative, with an industrial/warehouse look and feel. The project is currently still only at visualisation stage.
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Nike Camp Victory Pavilion – Oregon

Ok, I know I am a massive Nike Fan Boy. I have recently written about all they have been doing during the olympics with pop-up stores  But this Camp Victory is immense and certainly worth a mention.

The temporary installation was created for the Olympics and sits within the Oregon University campus. Severe geometric shapes illuminated by L.E.D lighting form the various facades of the building. Inside, scattered amongst the various display walls and glass tanks are more interactive innovations along the lines of what we have seen in the Fuelstation and House of Innovation. Read More…

Does/is Retail Design Need to change?

Retail design creativity has to be driven by new innovative technological thinking. I’ve recently been considering the retail design situation in the high street and many recurring shopping centres. It’s becoming too static. Samey. New shopping centres like Westfield are regurgitating the same look and feel, and the same shopfits. Flagship has become roll out, or visa versa.

We work on Retail design and delivery in my agency, approving new shop designs in shopping centres all over the country. A common problem is that landlords are desperate to get big brands in to shopping centres and whilst they want the best look for their malls in terms of shop design, they do not want to rock the boat so much by demanding more elaborate, show stopping designs that results in tenants deciding to opt out. But as brand guardians, is of course our desire to see thought provoking or jaw dropping design. Read More…

Nike + House of Innovation in Selfridges, London

Another day, another pop-up store by Nike. This time in Selfridges, London. The shop is more aligned with the fuel station concept of Box Park, showcasing  the brands latest digitally enabled products.

A series of events hosted by Nike’s global director for the Olympics, Martin Lotti, demonstrate the latest innovations to be used during the London 2012 Olympic games. Again the space is not so much about the display of physical product and is more so focused on multi channel and digital interventions to tell the brands latest story. Read More…

Nike Pop-Up Liberty, London

Nike are one of the many pop-up shops appearing around London in preperation for the Olympics. The brand have recently acquired a beautiful atrium space in Liberty, London.

Their pop-up is perfectly fitting for the Liberty’s customer and the surrounding architecture. It has elegance and grace in the form of ornately detailed balloons that spiral up through the atrium. It juxtaposes the store interestingly however with the use of premium materials and illuminated feature walls behind bespoke contemporary/traditional furniture. Read More…

Camper, House of Shoes, New York

I like Camper’s playful store designs. I have seen various throughout the world and they all adopt the same mantra, interaction and fun. From graffiti walls (here) and stairs to nowhere (here) to velvet tissues that line walls begging to be touched as they flap around in the breeze from outside, in Barcelona (here) and floating shoes (here). Each and every store has its own identity or new twist, but is instantly recognisable as part of the Camper brand.

Their new Soho, New York store is no different. The store on entry appears to be without product. In its place a massive Camper logo adorns a red wall serrated at 45 degree angles, running down to the rear of the store. It is not until the customer travels further in to the store that product is actually revealed house in pidgeon holes in the reveals of the serated red wall. A nice playful touch. Read More…